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The UPW offices will be closed in observance of President's Day on Monday, February 19, 2018. Offices will reopen on Tuesday, February 20, 2018 at 7:30 am.

50 Years, UPW Remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King

2018 marks 50 years since the passing of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In honor of his memory, we have posted his Nobel lecture, and a link to his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. We have also included a link to a video from the MLK Parade, UPW participated in on January 15, 2018. In his Nobel lecture, MLK said, "Every man lives in two realms, the internal and the external. The internal is that realm of spiritual ends expressed in art, literature, morals, and religion. The external is that complex of devices, techniques, mechanisms, and instrumentalities by means of which we live. Our problem today is that we have allowed the internal to become lost in the external. ...This problem of spiritual and moral lag, which constitutes modern man's chief dilemma, expresses itself in three larger problems which grow out of man's ethical infantilism. Each of these problems, while appearing to be separate and isolated, is inextricably bound to the other. I refer to racial injustice, poverty, and war."

 

The Quest for Peace and Justice

(the text of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King's Nobel lecture)


It is impossible to begin this lecture without again expressing my deep appreciation to the Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Parliament for bestowing upon me and the civil rights movement in the United States such a great honor. Occasionally in life there are those moments of unutterable fulfillment which cannot be completely explained by those symbols called words. Their meaning can only be articulated by the inaudible language of the heart. Such is the moment I am presently experiencing. I experience this high and joyous moment not for myself alone but for those devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice and who in the process have acquired a new estimate of their own human worth. Many of them are young and cultured. Others are middle aged and middle class. The majority are poor and untutored. But they are all united in the quiet conviction that it is better to suffer in dignity than to accept segregation in humiliation. These are the real heroes of the freedom struggle: they are the noble people for whom I accept the Nobel Peace Prize.

 

This evening I would like to use this lofty and historic platform to discuss what appears to me to be the most pressing problem confronting mankind today. Modern man has brought this whole world to an awe-inspiring threshold of the future. He has reached new and astonishing peaks of scientific success. He has produced machines that think and instruments that peer into the unfathomable ranges of interstellar space. He has built gigantic bridges to span the seas and gargantuan buildings to kiss the skies. His airplanes and spaceships have dwarfed distance, placed time in chains, and carved highways through the stratosphere. This is a dazzling picture of modern man's scientific and technological progress.

 

Yet, in spite of these spectacular strides in science and technology, and still unlimited ones to come, something basic is missing. There is a sort of poverty of the spirit which stands in glaring contrast to our scientific and technological abundance. The richer we have become materially, the poorer we have become morally and spiritually. We have learned to fly the air like birds and swim the sea like fish, but we have not learned the simple art of living together as brothers.

 

Every man lives in two realms, the internal and the external. The internal is that realm of spiritual ends expressed in art, literature, morals, and religion. The external is that complex of devices, techniques, mechanisms, and instrumentalities by means of which we live. Our problem today is that we have allowed the internal to become lost in the external. We have allowed the means by which we live to outdistance the ends for which we live. So much of modern life can be summarized in that arresting dictum of the poet Thoreau1: "Improved means to an unimproved end". This is the serious predicament, the deep and haunting problem confronting modern man. If we are to survive today, our moral and spiritual "lag" must be eliminated. Enlarged material powers spell enlarged peril if there is not proportionate growth of the soul. When the "without" of man's nature subjugates the "within", dark storm clouds begin to form in the world...Read the entire lecture here

UPW Participates in the AFL-CIO Labor of Love

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Upcoming Events
Maui Division Executive Board Meeting Mar 03, 2018 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM — UPW Maui Division Office
Oahu Division Executive Board Meeting Mar 08, 2018 06:00 PM - 08:00 PM — Henry B. Epstein Building (1426 N. School Street)
Private Sector Division Executive Board Meeting Mar 09, 2018 06:00 PM - 08:00 PM — Henry B. Epstein Building, 1426 N. School Street
Hawaii Division Executive Board Meeting Mar 17, 2018 09:30 AM - 11:30 AM — UPW Hilo Building
Kauai Division Executive Board Meeting Apr 05, 2018 06:00 PM - 08:00 PM — UPW Kauai Division Office
Upcoming events…

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